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1939

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The origins of 3Tre: the project of Canalone Miramonti

Back in the 1930s, when alpine skiing became a worldwide phenomenon, Madonna di Campiglio was facing a problem: designing a network of ski tracks, finishing on a descent, in the valley which surrounded the region. At that point, the town had already put itself on the map of major winter sports, after hosting the national, regional and fascist games. It was therefore necessary to adapt the ski offer to the most modern requirements, both from a touristic, as well as a sporting point of view. The solution was found in 1939 by a special committee, composed of members of the local ski school (with Bruno Detassis in charge): they submitted the project of realizing a new racing slope, initially thought for the fascist games – to the Municipality of Pinzolo: the Canalone Miramonti was born.

1950

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January 1950, Paganella – Serrada di Folgaria – Bondone

A beautiful and sunny day is ready to receive its guests on the Paganella and the first turns in the history of 3Tre. At the start of the slope there are 57 competitors, coming from Italy, Germany, Austria, Yugoslavia, USA and Turkey. Zeno Colò puts its grip on the race and wins easily, with a 15-second gap on Alvera.

The following day, the caravan moved to Serrada di Folgaria, where everyone was ready for the “discesa obbligata”, the slalom. The athletes had to climb up the race parcours by foot. Once again, Zeno Colò is the winner.

The grand finale of the inaugural edition takes place on Bondone, where the Champion from the Abetone (Colò) could not report, as he was already on his way to the World Championships in Aspen.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Zeno Colò (ITA); 2. Albino Alverà (ITA); 3. Mario Beltrandi (ITA)   slalom – 1. Zeno Colò (ITA); 2. Josef Volger (BRD); 3. Ermanno Nogler (ITA) slalom giant slalom – 1. Vittorio Chierroni (ITA); 2. Alberto Marcellin (ITA); 3. Hermann Nogler (ITA)

combined – 1. Ermanno Nogler (ITA); 2. Vittorio Chierroni (ITA); Alberto Marcellin (ITA)

nations standings: 1. Italy; 2. Germany; 3. Austria

1950 COPIA

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January 1950, Paganella – Serrada di Folgaria – Bondone

A beautiful and sunny day is ready to receive its guests on the Paganella and the first turns in the history of 3Tre. At the start of the slope there are 57 competitors, coming from Italy, Germany, Austria, Yugoslavia, USA and Turkey. Zeno Colò puts its grip on the race and wins easily, with a 15-second gap on Alvera.

The following day, the caravan moved to Serrada di Folgaria, where everyone was ready for the “discesa obbligata”, the slalom. The athletes had to climb up the race parcours by foot. Once again, Zeno Colò is the winner.

The grand finale of the inaugural edition takes place on Bondone, where the Champion from the Abetone (Colò) could not report, as he was already on his way to the World Championships in Aspen.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Zeno Colò (ITA); 2. Albino Alverà (ITA); 3. Mario Beltrandi (ITA)   slalom – 1. Zeno Colò (ITA); 2. Josef Volger (BRD); 3. Ermanno Nogler (ITA) slalom giant slalom – 1. Vittorio Chierroni (ITA); 2. Alberto Marcellin (ITA); 3. Hermann Nogler (ITA)

combined – 1. Ermanno Nogler (ITA); 2. Vittorio Chierroni (ITA); Alberto Marcellin (ITA)

nations standings: 1. Italy; 2. Germany; 3. Austria

1951

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January 1951, Paganella – Serrada di Folgaria – Bondone

The “Three Days” of alpine skiing returns on the same slopes as in the previous year. The ones who laid their mark on the inaugural edition aren’t at the start: Colò, Alverà and Gartner, after endless arguments, are sent to Wengen, for the Lauberhorn downhill. In the first race, Ermanno Nogler lands the win, ahead of Amedeo Catturani.

Folgaria saw the first foreign victory in the 3Tre: France’s Firmin Mathis defeats Zauner, from Austria. Nogler comes only 12th, after being penalized by the jury for laying down a gate (old times regulations!). In the giant slalom of Bondone, another Frenchman was victorious, Gerard Pasquier; Nogler kept the Fulmine leader’s jersey and went home with a 65cc Moto Guzzi and 250 000 lire in cash.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Ermanno Nogler (ITA); 2. Amedeo Catturani (ITA); 3. Alois Zauner (AUT)

slalom – Firmin Mathis (FRA); 2. Alois Zauner (AUT); 3. Silvio Alverà (ITA)

giant slalom – 1. Gerard Pasquier (FRA); 2. Alois Zauner (AUT); 3. Silvio Alverà (ITA)

combined – 1. Ermanno Nogler (ITA); Amedeo Catturani (ITA); Dino Pompanin (ITA)

nations standings: 1. Italy; 2. Austria; 3. Germany

1952

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San Martino di Castrozza

After two successful editions, the 3Tre faced its first major crisis, threatening the extinction of the event soon after its birth. The reason was the exclusion from the FIS calendar, as a result of overlapping with the Oslo Olympics. A direct consequence was a financial loss. It resulted in turmoil even in the organizing committee. Eventually, CCamillo Rusconi succeeds, together with Benedict Bertamini and Bill Cestari (the young, but popular journalist of Alto Adige), in running the event in San Martino di Castrozza, where Frenchman Francois Baud wins the first giant slalom, that took place as a result of the lack of snow that led to the cancellation of the downhill. Guido Ghedina takes the slalom (ahead of the young Adrien Duvillard), as well as the second giant slalom. The final classification is won by the same Ghedina.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Francois Baud (FRA); 2. Guido Ghedina (ITA); 3. Adrien Duvillard (FRA)

slalom – 1. Guido Ghedina (ITA); 2. Francois Baud (FRA); 3. George Panisset (FRA)

giant slalom – Guido Ghedina (ITA); 2. Adrien Duvillard (FRA); 3. Richard Berthet (FRA)

combined – Guido Ghedina (ITA); Francois Baud (FRA); George Panisset (FRA)

nations standings: 1. Italy; 2. France; 3. Yugoslavia

1953

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Canazei – Marmolada

Not many competitors came to the start of the fourth 3Tre. Only 42 were there, but among them there were the best foreigners of the moment, Austrians Obereigner and Hinterseer, and the two Swiss stars – Rey and Schneider. The two of them dominated the two slaloms. In the opening giant slalom in Canazei, René Rey is the one who lands the win ahead of Ernst Obereigner; one day later, Rey repeats this feat in front of his countryman Schneider, gold medalist at the Aspen World Championships. In Marmolada, the winner is Carlo Gartner (who had been ruled out of the Azzurri team for the 3Tre on the day before!), who dominates the giant slalom that replaced the downhill .

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. René Rey (SUI); 2. Ernst Obereigner (AUT); 3. Otto Gluck (AUT)

slalom – 1. René Rey (SUI); 2. George Schneider (SUI); 3. Ernst Obereigner (AUT)

giant slalom – 1. Carlo Gartner (ITA); 2. René Rey (SUI); 3. Ernst Hinterseer (AUT)

combined – 1. René Rey (SUI); 2. Ernst Obereigner (AUT); 3. Carlo Gartner (ITA)

nations standings: 1. Switzerland; 2. Italy; 3. France

1954

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Marmolada

The rising star of international ski, the blond Norwegian Stein Eriksen, arrived in Trentino with two gold medals in the bag, recently won at the World Championships in Åre. However, after crashing in the opening giant slalom, he left the door open for an Austrian triple.

Controversy sparked the next day, as no Italian skier was at the start, as a complaint on the race numbers’ seeding system. As a result, the glory goes to the man of the moment, Stein Eriksen. The following day sees once again the downhill being cancelled due to heavy snow. In the giant slalom which replaces the initial race, Pravda is victorious and takes home the Maglia Fulmine, that rewards the winner of the overall standings.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Christian Pravda (AUT); 2. Ernst Hinterseer (AUT); 3. Ernst Obereigner (AUT)

slalom– 1. Stein Eriksen (NOR); 2. Ernst Hinterseer (AUT); 3. Christian Pravda (AUT)

giant slalom – 1. Christian Pravda (AUT); 2. Stein Eriksen (NOR); 3. Ernst Hinterseer (AUT)

combined – 1. Christian Pravda (AUT); 2. Ernst Hinterseer (AUT); 3. Ernst Obereigner (AUT)

nations standings: 1. Austria; 2. Italy; 3. France

1955

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Canazei

It was an Austrian celebration in the sixth edition, the competitors from this country being head and shoulders above anyone else, thanks to the likes of Josl Rieder and Toni Sailer.

Also, this edition sees the event introduce a modern element: for the first time, it was a photocell to mark the athletes’ times.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Josl Rieder (AUT); 2. Toni Sailer (AUT); 3. Walter Schuster (AUT)

slalom – 1. Josl Rieder (AUT); 2. Hermann Gamon (AUT); 3. Toni Mark (AUT)

giant slalom – 1. Toni Sailer (AUT); 2. Josl Rieder (AUT); 3. Egon Zimmermann (AUT) ex. Walter Schuster (AUT)

combined – 1. Josl Rieder (AUT); 2. Toni Sailer (AUT); 3. Egon Zimmermann (AUT)

nations standings: 1. Austria; 2. Italy A; 3. Italy B

1956

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Marmolada

It’s the year of the Cortina d’Ampezzo Olympics. Toni Sailer is still distracted, celebrating his memorable victories at the Olympics (three gold medals in three different disciplines, an incredible record), making life easy to his countryman Ernst Hinterseer. The skier from Kitzbuhel also takes the overall, in which the brothers Burrini, Bruno and Gino, finish seventh and eighth respectively.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Ernst Hinterseer (AUT); 2. Ernst Obereigner (AUT) ex. Josl Rieder (AUT); 4. Charles Bozon (FRA)

slalom – 1. Josl Rieder (AUT); 2. Charles Bozon (FRA); 3. Walter Schuster (AUT)

giant slalom – 1. Ernst Hinterseer (AUT); 2. Josl Rieder (AUT); 3. Werner Wallace (USA)

combined – 1. Ernst Hinterseer (AUT); 2. Josl Rieder (AUT); 3. Ernst Obereigner (AUT)

nations standings: 1. Austria; 2. France; 3. Germany

1957

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February 1957, Madonna di Campiglio

After visiting numerous venues in Trentino, the 3Tre arrives in Madonna di Campiglio, that will eventually become its “home”, with just a few exceptions. Gianvittorio Fossati Bellani was the man behind this change – born in Lombardia, but adopted by Campiglio – at that time president of the local cableways company, and technical director of the Italian national team.

The first edition in Campiglio is marked by uncertainty and balance, as there’s no big favorite. Ultimately, the class of Toni Mark prevails, the Austrian winning the downhill and the general classification.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Charles Bozon (FRA); 2. Paride Miliani (ITA); 3. Gehrard Hillbrand (AUT)

downhill – 1. Toni Mark (AUT); 2. Gehrard Hillbrand (AUT); 3. Paride Miliani (ITA)

giant slalom – 1. Egon Zimmermann (AUT); 2. Charles Bozon (FRA); 3. Toni Mark (AUT)

combined – 1. Toni Mark (AUT); 2. Charles Bozon (FRA); 3. Gehrard Hillbrand (AUT)

nations standings: 1. Austria; 2. Italy; 3. Switzerland

1958

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February 1958, Madonna di Campiglio

Finally, after a five-year drought, an Italian returns to winning ways in the 3Tre: it is the rising star Bruno Alberti, who won a race dubbed the “controversial giant slalom”. In that race, France’s Vuarnet (bronze medalist at the Badgastein World Championships) received permission to start last, to take a breather after climbing by foot to the start, in spite of bib number 3. The French team doesn’t need too long to take its revenge, and in the following day, Duvillard wins the slalom after defeating Schaller, from Austria. The same Duvillard fights for the victory also in the downhill, but he ends up in a spectacular crash of 60 meters and is taken to the hospital. Victorious is Forrer, from Switzerland, who wins with a comfortable margin ahead of Alberti.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Bruno Alberti (ITA); 2. Paride Milianti (ITA); 3. Willy Forrer (SUI)

slalom – 1. Adrien Duvillard (FRA); 2. Helmuth Schaller (AUT); 3. Tom Corcoran (USA)

downhill – 1. Willy Forrer (SUI); 2. Bruno Alberti (ITA); 3. Pepi Gramshammer (AUT)

combined – 1. Willy Forrer (SUI); 2. Tom Corcoran (USA); Pepi Gramshammer (AUT) nations standings: 1. Italy; 2. Switzerland; 3. Austria

1959

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February 1959, Madonna di Campiglio

It’s the year of Karl Schranz, who was approaching the twilight of his career. The 3Tre sees the world’s elite skiers at the start, and the giant slalom is run on the Spinale, where the Austrian wins in front of Bruno Alberti. Schranz repeats this feat on the Pancugolo downhill, while the slalom which takes place on Spinale sees a French Triple (with Bozon coming home first).

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Karl Schranz (AUT); 2. Bruno Alberti (ITA); 3. Guy Perillat (FRA)

downhill – 1. Karl Schranz (AUT); 2. Willy Forrer (SUI); 3. Bruno Alberti (ITA)

slalom – 1. Charles Bozon (FRA); 2. Jean Vuarnet (FRA) ex. Francois Bonlieau (FRA); 4. Hias Leitner (AUT)

combined – 1. Karl Schranz (AUT); 2. Francois Bonlieau (FRA); 3. Pepi Gramshammer (AUT)

nations standings: 1. Austria; 2. France; 3. Switzerland

1960

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February 1960, Madonna di Campiglio

In a snow-covered Campiglio, the 11th edition of 3Tre goes underway: Austria’s Pepi Gramshammer grabs the Maglia Fulmine from the start, winning the Spinale giant slalom in impossible weather conditions (with a time of 4 minutes and 40 seconds, after the race has been postponed for three hours in the afternoon). The following day, Michel Arpin takes the slalom on 5 Laghi. The downhill sees France winning and placing a total of seven skiers in the first eight.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Pepi Gramshammer (AUT); 2. Benis Stamos (AUT); 3. Giuliano Talmon (ITA)

slalom– 1. Michel Arpin (FRA); 2. Egon Zimmermann II (AUT); 3. Helmut Gartner (ITA)

downhill – 1. George Duvillard (FRA); 2. Gaston Perrot (FRA); 3. Pierre Stamos (FRA)

combined – 1. Pepi Gramshammer (AUT); 2. Benis Stamos (AUT); Egon Zimmermann II (AUT)

nations standings: 1. Austria A; 2. Germany A; 3. Austria C

1961

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February 1961, Canazei

For the last time in history, 3Tre travels through Trentino before landing in Campiglio for good. And, for the first time, an exceptional athlete comes at the start: Aga Kahn Karim, who competes for Great Britain having alongside him his personal coach Hans Senger and two splendid German blondes.

In the downhill, more than 30 of the 80 runners don’t reach the finish line. The race is won by Egon Zimmerman, ahead of Nenning and Alberti. This is the edition during which Carletto Senoner comes into the spotlight, after being discovered by coach Ermanno Nogler. Senoner wins both slalom races.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Egon Zimmermann II (AUT); 2. Gerhard Nenning (AUT); 3. Bruno Alberti (ITA)

slalom – 1. Carlo Senoner (ITA); 2. Egon Zimmermann II (AUT); 3. Felix de Nicolò (ITA)

giant slalom – 1. Carlo Senoner (ITA); 2. Bruno Alberti (ITA); 3. Egon Zimmermann II (AUT)

combined – 1. Egon Zimmermann II (AUT); 2. Bruno Alberti (ITA); 3. Carlo Senoner (ITA)

nations standings: 1. Austria A; 2. Italy A; 3. France

1962

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February 1962, Madonna di Campiglio

For its 13th edition, the 3Tre returns to Madonna di Campiglio, and this time is for good. This edition will be remembered for Paride Milianti’s feat, winning both the giant slalom and the combined. Bruno Alberti takes the downhill, thanks to an incredible run on the Pancugolo slope.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Bruno Alberti (ITA); 2. Sigfried Draxi (AUT); 3. Yves Bienvenu (FRA)

giant slalom – 1. Paride Milianti (ITA); 2. Italo Pedroncelli (ITA); 3. Bruno Alberti (ITA)

slalom – 1. Mathias Leitner (AUT); 2. Felix de Nicolò (ITA); 3. Paride Milianti (ITA)

combined – 1. Paride Milianti (ITA); 2. Mathias Leitner (AUT); 3. Bruno Alberti (ITA)

nations standings: 1. Italy A; 2. Austria A; 3. Austria B

1963

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February 1963, Madonna di Campiglio

There are two crowned heads who come to Campiglio for the 14th edition of 3Tre: Aga Khan and the heir to the throne of Spain, Juan Carlos Bourbon, who arrives as a spectator.

The Pancugolo downhill is won by Germany’s Wolfgang Barthels, while Austrian Gerhard Nenning is first in the Spinale giant slalom. Italy gets its share of success in the slalom, where Pedroncelli wins and Senorer comes third, redeeming the thus far disappointing Italian 3Tre campaign.

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Wolfgang Barthels (BRD); 2. Leo La Croix (FRA); 3. Carlo Senoner (ITA)

giant slalom – 1. Gerhard Nenning (AUT); 2. Joos Misch (SUI); 3. Jean Claud Killy (FRA)

slalom – 1. Italo Pedroncelli (ITA); 2. Ludwig Leitner (BRD); 3. Carlo Senoner (ITA)

combined – 1. Carlo Senoner (ITA); 2. Leo La Croix (FRA); 3. Joos Minsch (SUI)

nations standings: 1. France A; 2. Italy A; 3. Italy B

1964

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January 1964, Madonna di Campiglio

The 15th edition of 3Tre was a particular one, due to the fact that the national federations called for a training session on the downhill course, as preparation for the Innsbruck Olympics. For this reason, the 3Tre schedules two downhills in that year.

It’s also a year with almost no snow. In the morning of January 18th, on the Pancugolo, an exciting race sees five competitors coming in the space of a tenth of a second. Willy Bogner takes the win, and the German dominance is confirmed one day later, when Wolfgang Barthels lands the victory, his second in Campiglio.

This edition went down in history also for an unusual episode, which involved Gerhard Mussner; in the first downhill, the Italian crashed, jumping over the whole finish parterre and ending up on the road.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Willy Bogner (BRD); 2. Joos Minsch (SUI); 3. Karl Schranz (AUT)

downhill – 1. Wolfgang Barthels (BRD); 2. Egon Zimmermann (AUT); 3. Karl Schranz (AUT)

combined – 1. Karl Schranz (AUT); 2. Dumen Giovanoli (SUI); 3. Wolfgang Barthels (BRD)

nations standings: 1. Austria; 2. Germany; 3. Switzerland

1965

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February 1965, Madonna di Campiglio

The French school reiterates its values once again in the 16th edition of the 3Tre, with Jules Melquiond taking both the giant slalom and the slalom. However, the combined goes to Austria’s Heini Messner, third in the Pancugolo downhill and second in the giant slalom. For the host nation, Renato Valentini is the best: fourth in the downhill and tenth in the slalom.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Stefan Sodat (AUT); 2. Gerhard Mussner (ITA); 3. Heini Messner (AUT)

giant slalom – 1. Jules Melquiond (FRA); 2. Heini Messner (AUT); 3. Gerhard Mussner (ITA)

slalom– 1. Jules Melquiond (FRA); 2. Georges Manduit (FRA); 3. Gerhard Mussner (ITA

combined – 1. Heini Messner (AUT); 2. Gerhard Mussner (ITA); 3. Jules Melquiond (FRA)

nations standings: 1. Italy A; 2. Austria A; 3. France A

1966

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February 1966, Madonna di Campiglio

In the downhill that by tradition opens the event, Switzerland’s Joos Minsch scores a surprising victory. Leitner, from Germany, wins the slalom. A heavy snowfall affects the giant slalom, making the course (57 gates) very dangerous. Heini Messner is the one who takes the victory, which helps him finish first in the overall standings.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Joos Minsch (SUI); 2. Egon Zimmermann II (AUT); 3. Ivo Mahlknecht (ITA)

slalom– 1. Ludwig Leitner (BRD); 2. Haakan Mojen (NOR); 3. Willi Bogner (BRD)

giant slalom – 1. Heini Messner (AUT); 2. Ludwig Leitner (BRD); 3. Ivo Mahlknecht (ITA)

combined – 1. Heini Messner (AUT); 2. Ivo Mahlknecht (ITA); 3. Ludwig Leitner (BRD) nations standings: 1. Austria; 2. Switzerland A; 3. Italy B

1967

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February 1967, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

Skiing, step by step, is entering in a new era. The age of the pioneers is gone, as well as the “transition” one of Alberti and Milianti. The French team led by Bonnet has revolutionized the technique of the sport, which in 1967 witnesses the inaugural edition of the World Cup.

The 3Tre is welcomed in the calendar (created in the summer of 1966, in Portillo) immediately and the slalom becomes the first Italian men’s race in the history of the competition.

In Campiglio, on live TV, there’s also Virna Lisi, ready to take a picture with the best competitors. The edition is dominated by the French, who score a hat-trick, with Perillat head and shoulders above the others. Perillat wins the giant slalom, the slalom and the combined, and thanks to his impressive run he also takes the overall.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Heini Messner (AUT); 2. Guy Perillat (FRA); 3. Hans Peter Rohr (SUI)

giant slalom – 1. Guy Perillat (FRA); 2. Karl Schranz (AUT); 3. Stefen Kalin (SUI)

slalom – 1. Guy Perillat (FRA); 2. Luis Jauffret (FRA); 3. Leo Lacroix (FRA)

combined – 1. Guy Perillat (FRA); 2. Heini Messner (AUT); 3. Ivo Mahlknecht (ITA)

nations standings: 1. France; 2. Italy A; 3. Austria A

1968

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January 1968, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup) (organized, but not held)

1969

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January 1969, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

Two silent Italians make their way to the starting gate at the 20th edition of 3Tre. They are relatives and their names are Rolando Thoeni (Bib 87) and Gustavo Thoeni (Bib 89): a hint of what was to come.

However, the downhill is dominated by Switzerland, Michel Daetwyler winning ahead Kurt Huggler and Bernhard Russi.

Then, the Germans come into the spotlight, with Gerhard Prinzing taking the giant slalom, in front of his countryman Joseph Haeckemuller. The Italians land a victory in the slalom, thanks to Felix de Nicolò.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Michel Daetwyler (SUI); 2. Kurt Huggler (SUI); 3. Bernhard Russi (SUI)

giant slalom – 1. Gerhard Prinzing (BRD); 2. Joseph Haeckemuller (BRD); 3. Bengt Grahn (SVE)

slalom – 1. Felix de Nicolò (ITA); 2. Gerhard Riml (AUT); 3. Andrzej Bachleda (POL)

combined – 1. Gerhard Prinzing (BRD); 2. Bengt Grahn (SVE); 3. Max Rieger (BRD) nations standings: 1. Switzerland A; 2. Germay A; 3. Italy

1970

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January 1970, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

The era of Gustav Thoeni (winner of four World Cups and 24 races during his career, as well as an Olympic gold in Sapporo 1972 and four world titles) has now begun. The champion from Trafoi wins in Val d’Isère, and then comes to Campiglio, where two giant slaloms and a slalom are due to take place. The major absentee is Karl Schranz.

The two giant slaloms (first on Spinale, the second on Pancugolo) are dominated by Gustav, not without controversy: in the first race, a commissaire assesses that the Italian skipped a gate. Thoeni isn’t penalized, thanks to the testimony of Austrian Heini Messner and Felix de Nicolò. Henri Brechu finishes first in the slalom, thus preventing Thoeni to record an historic treble.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Gustav Thoeni (ITA); Dumeng Giovanoli (SUI); Jean Noel Augert (FRA)

giant slalom – 1. Gustav Thoeni (ITA); Edmund Bruggmann (SUI); 3. Jean Noel Augert (FRA)

slalom – 1. Henri Brechu (FRA); Gustav Thoeni (ITA); 3. Dumeng Giovanoli (SUI)

combined – 1. Gustav Thoeni (ITA); 2. Werner Bleiner (AUT); 3. Jakob Tischauser (SUI)

nations standings: 1. Italy A; 2. France A; 3. Austria B

1971

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January 1971, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

The 3Tre giant slalom is now a well-known stop of the White Circus, and in 1971 it’s scheduled to take place on the Pancugolo. Once again, the Marseillaise is heard in Trentino, as a result of Henry Duvillard’s victory, who comes ahead of his countryman Patrick Russel and Thoeni.

On the slopes of Miramonti, Thoeni has a fine run in front of the big names, thus confirming that the slalom is the discipline in which Italy places its hopes when it comes to him.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Henry Duvillard (FRA); 2. Patrick Russel (FRA); 3. Gustav Thoeni (ITA)

slalom – 1. Gustav Thoeni (ITA); 2. Jean Noel Augert (FRA); 3. Patrick Russel (FRA)

combined – 1. Gustav Thoeni (ITA); 2. Patrick Russel (FRA); Edmund Bruggmann (SUI)

nations standings: 1. France A; 2. Itay A; 3. Austria A

1972

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December 1972, Madonna di Campiglio – Val Gardena (World Cup)

Due to the calendar, two 3Tre take place in year 1972: indeed, after the 23rd edition in March, the 24th takes place in December of the same year, occupying a spot that it would not leave anymore. One name stands above the others: Piero Gros. Basically, he lays his mark over this edition, as a result of his success in the slalom, despite having the Bib 42. That’s the second victory of his career. This feat overshadows the win of Rolland Collombin (SUI) in the downhill and the one of David Zwilling (AUT) in the giant slalom.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Roland Collombin (SUI); 2. Karl Cordin (AUT); 3. David Zwilling (AUT)

giant slalom – 1. David Zwilling (AUT); 2. Adolf Rosti (SUI); 3. Eberhard Schmalz (ITA)

slalom – 1. Piero Gros (ITA); Gustav Thoeni (ITA); 3. Christian Neureuther (BRD)

combined – 1. David Zwilling (AUT); Bob Cochran (USA); 3. Walter Tresch (SUI)

1972

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March 1972, Madonna di Campiglio – Val Gardena (World Cup)

The Sapporo Olympics helped the two Thoeni carve their place in history; apart of that, Gustav is also in the fight for the World Cup. The 3Tre comes with two locations for this edition: the downhill and the giant slalom take place in Val Gardena, while the slalom is scheduled for Campiglio. The Swiss team wins in South Tyrol (Russi in the downhill and Bruggman in the giant slalom); on the Miramonti, Thoeni is victorious, edging both the slalom and the combined.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Bernhard Russi (SUI); 2. René Berthod (SUI); 3. Mike Lafferty (USA)

giant slalom – 1. Edmund Bruggmann (SUI); 2. Reinhard Trischer (SUI); 3. Roland Thoeni (ITA)

slalom – 1. Roland Thoeni (ITA); 2. Alain Penz (FRA); 3. Andrzej Bachleda (POL)

combined – 1. Roland Thoeni (ITA); 2. Gustav Thoeni (ITA); 3. Andrzej Bachleda (POL)

1973

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December 1973, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup) (organized, but not held)

1974

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December 1974, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

 

In the history of alpine skiing and of the World Cup, a Swedish skier burst into the scene, showing his huge talent and capturing in Campiglio the first victory in what was going to be an unmatched career (a record 86 victories, two Olympic gold medals, five world titles and three World Cups): Ingemar Stenmark. In the first slalom of the season, the young Swede (who wasn’t 19 at that time) wins ahead of Paolo de Chiesa and Fausto Radici. In the giant slalom – which finishes for the first time at Patascoss – Piero Gros is first, followed by Greg Jones (USA) and Tino Pietrogiovanna.

 

Roll of honour:

giant slalom – 1. Piero Gros (ITA); 2. Greg Jones (USA); 3. Tino Pietrogiovanna (ITA)

slalom – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Paolo de Chiesa (ITA); 3. Fausto Radici (ITA)

combined – 1. Piero Gros (ITA); 2. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 3. Paolo de Chiesa (ITA)

1975

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December 1975, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

A downhill and a giant slalom: this is the innovative schedule of the 3Tre in December 1975. The downhill takes place on the Pancugolo “highway”, a completely redesigned track, that doesn’t resembles anymore with the one of the past. The fastest in Campiglio is the fastest in the history of skiing, “Kaiser” Franz Klammer, who wins also the combined. In the giant slalom, the Swiss Engelhard Pargaetzi takes the victory ahead of Ernst Good, his countryman.

 

Roll of honour:

downhill – 1. Franz Klammer (AUT); 2. Philip Roux (SUI; 3. Erik Haker (NOR)

giant slalom – 1. Engelhard Pargaetzi (SUI); 2. Ernst Good (SUI); 3. Piero Gros (ITA)

combined – 1. Franz Klammer (AUT); 2. Steve Padborski (CAN); 3. Jim Hunter (CAN)

1976

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December 1976, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

In 1976, the White Circus makes a stop in Campiglio for just one race, which will eventually go down in the history of Italian skiing. Radici, Gros, Thoeni: a memorable treble which seals the unique sport phenomenon that once was the “Blue Valanga”.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Fausto Radici (ITA); 2. Piero Gros (ITA); 3. Gustav Thoeni (ITA)

1977

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December 1977, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

One name: Ingemar Stenmark. The Swedish champion dominates the 1977 edition of the 3Tre, winning all the races: giant slalom, slalom and combined.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); Klaus Heidegger (AUT); 3. Bojan Krizay (YUG)

giant slalom – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); Heini Hemmi (AUT); 3. Andreas Wenzel (LIE)

combined – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); Klaus Heidegger (AUT); 3. Andreas Wenzel (LIE)

1978

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December 1978, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

Le esigenze del calendario della Coppa del Mondo portano ancora una volta la 3Tre a una sola giornata di gare, concentrata nello slalom speciale del Miramonti. Lo slalom di Campiglio è il primo della stagione iridata; una tracciatura-trabocchetto dell’allenatore azzurro Arigoni induce a una prova opaca Stenmark, costringendo alla resa lui ma anche altri 49 concorrenti. Due svizzeri concludono così ai primi due posti: Martial Donnet e Peter Luscher.
L’indomani, nel parallelo di contorno, lo svedese si riscatta davanti a Mauro Bernardi.

Albo d’oro:
slalom speciale – 1. Martial Donnet (SUI); 2.
Peter Luscher (SUI); 3. Christian Neureuther (BRD)
slalom parallelo – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Mauro Bernardi (ITA); 3. Carlo Trojer (ITA)
combinata – 1. Christian Neureuther (BRD); 2. Martial Donnet (SUI); 3. Bojan Krizay (YUG)

1979

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1979/80 – 31st edition

December 1979, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

“Ingo” is back at his best and leaves his mark on the whole edition of the 3Tre; in December 1979, the Swede takes the slalom, the giant slalom and the combined. Coming from Yugoslavia, Bojan Krizay makes himself noticed, finishing runner-up twice and third once.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Bojan Krizay (YUG); 3. Paul Frommelt (LIE)

giant slalom – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Jacques Luthy (SUI); 3. Bojan Krizay (YUG)

combined – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Bojan Krizay (YUG); 3. Jacques Luthy (SUI)

1980

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December 1980, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

Stenmark, always Stenmark: the 1980 is again dominated by the Swede, who takes all the laurels. The Swede is first in the slalom, the giant slalom and the combined. Piero Gros too deserves a mention, as the giant slalom in Campiglio is the last of his career.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Paul Frommelt (LIE); 3. Bojan Krizay (YUG)

giant slalom – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Alexander Zhirov (URS); 3. Gerhard Jager (AUT)

combined – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Bojan Krizay (YUG); 3. Paul Frommelt (LIE)

1981

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December 1981, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

An American succeeds in putting an end to Stenmark’s reign. Phil Mahre wins the slalom which takes place in December 1981, ahead of the Swede and Paolo de Chiesa, from Italy. The event comes with a new specialty: the super G, that doesn’t take place here, because of the lack of snow, and thus is moved to Alta Badia.

 

Roll of honour:

Slalom – 1. Phil Mahre (USA); 2. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 3. Paolo de Chiesa (ITA)

1982

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December 1982, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

In December 1982, the 3Tre returns again with two races. The slalom is won by a Swede, not Ingemar Stenmark, but Stig Strand, who defeats Stenmark and Phil Mahre. The superG, taking place for the first time, is dominated by Michael Mair, the Italian who is followed by Hans Enn, from Austria, and Pirmin Zurbriggen, from Switzerland.

 

Roll of honour:

Slalom – 1. Stig Strand (SVE); 2. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 3. Phil Mahre (USA)

super G – 1. Michael Mair (ITA); 2. Hans Enn (AUT); 3. Pirmin Zurbriggen (SUI)

combined – 1. Pirmin Zurbriggen (SUI); 2. Christian Orlainsky (AUT); 3. Franz Gruber (AUT)

1983

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December 1983, Madonna di Campiglio – Val Gardena (World Cup)

The lack of snow sees the organizers make a change of plans: the super G is moved to Val Gardena, where the winner is the Swiss champion Pirmin Zurbriggen. On the Miramonti, for the last time, “King” Stenmark is victorious, scoring the 74th win (and the 36th in the slalom) of an incredible career.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 2. Robert Zoller (AUT); 3. Peter Popangelov (BUL)

super G – 1. Pirmin Zurbriggen (SUI); 2. Martin Hangl (SUI); 3. Leonard Stock (AUT)

combined – 1. Andreas Wenzel (LIE); Thomas Burgler (SUI); 3. Alex Giorgi (ITA)

1984

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December 1984, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

Bojan Krizay, Marc Girardelli, Andreas Wenzel: all of those three names enjoy a 3Tre win in December 1984. The skier from Yugoslavia finally manages to finish first in a slalom. Marc Girardelli (one of the best in history, winner of five World Cups and 46 races) lands his sole victory in Campiglio, in the super G, while Wenzel – from Liechtenstein – is victorious in the last combined the event scheduled.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Bojan Krizay (YUG); 2. Andreas Wenzel (LIE); 3. Peter Popangelov (BUL)

super G – 1. Marc Girardelli (LUX); 2. Pirmin Zurbriggen (SUI); 3. Martin Hangl (SUI)

combined – 1. Andreas Wenzel (LIE); Thomas Stangassinger (AUT); 3. Max Julien (SUI)

1985

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December 1985, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

An odd winter and the lack of snow force the organizers to stage just one race, the slalom, set to become the only 3Tre stage due to the contingencies in the international calendar Once again, a Swede climbs to the top of the podium at Canalone Miramonti. He is Jonas Nilsson, who finishes ahead of Bojan Krizay and Paul Frommelt. Huge disappointment for all the big favorites – from Stenmark to Girardelli, from Petrovic to de Chiesa.

 

Roll of honour:

Slalom – 1. Jonas Nilsson (SVE); 2. Bojan Krizay (YUG); 3. Paul Frommelt (LIE)

1986

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December 1986, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

After many winless years, the Italians are again protagonists on the Miramonti. The victory goes to Ivano Edalini, a custom officer from Collio Val Trompia, defeating Stenmark and Swiss Gaspoz.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Ivano Edalini (ITA); 2. Ingemar Stenmark (SVE); 3. Joel Gaspoz (SUI)

1987

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December 1987, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

A new era is beginning in the Campiglio skiing world: in December 1987, a “bomb” explodes and catches the attention of everyone else. Thus begins the era of the great Italian champion Alberto Tomba, who starts with Bib 24 in Campiglio and wins ahead of the Austrian Rudolf Nierlich. It’s also the beginning of a great career, which will continue until 1998, and will lead to 50 victories (three of them in Campiglio), three Olympics gold medals, two world titles and one World Cup.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Alberto Tomba (ITA); 2. Rudolf Nierlich (AUT); 3. Bojan Krizay (YUG)

1988

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December 1988, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

It went down in history as the “edition of the forty thousand”, because this is the number (although it may be an exaggeration) of spectators believed to have reported to the Canalone Miramonti in December 1988 to witness the great feat of Alberto Tomba. The skier from Bologna didn’t fail to meet the expectations, giving his fellow Italians a memorable victory in front of Marc Girardelli and Michael Trischer (AUT). Still, this didn’t happen without having a thrilling episode along the way: at the starting gate of the second run, the Italian brakes a snap-hook of his left boot, instantly repaired by the skiman. An intervention at the limits of the rules, that threatened to cancel Albertone’s exploit. In the end, though, the good sense and sportsmanship by all Nations’ team leaders eventually prevailed.

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Alberto Tomba (ITA); 2. Marc Girardelli (LUX); 3. Michael Trischer (AUT)

1989

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December 1989, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup) (organized, but not held)

A luckless edition. Everything seems to be in place for the race: the public is coming at the Miramonti and the competitors are at the start. Only thing missing is the green light for the first skier at the starting gate; before of that, though, a heavy rainfall poured on the slope. The race regularity could not be guaranteed, eventually forcing the race commissaries to cancel it.

1990

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December 1990, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

The nordic school is victorious in December 1990: the Norwegian Ole Christian Furuseth wins, followed by the Swede Thomas Fogdoe and the always strong Marc Girardelli.

 

Roll of honour:

Slalom – 1. Ole Christian Furuseth (NOR); 2. Thomas Fogdoe (SVE); 3. Marc Girardelli (LUX)

1991

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December 1991, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

The same Norway is at the top in Campiglio, this time thanks to Finn Christian Jagge (Olympic gold medalist at Albertville 1992, in the same discipline), who won ahead of Alberto Tomba and Thomas Fogdoe. Jagge has a special relationship with Campiglio: here, the Norwegian won his first (1991) and last (1999) World Cup race.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Finn Christian Jagge (NOR); 2. Alberto Tomba (ITA); 3. Thomas Fogdoe (SWE)

1992

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December 1992, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup) (European Cup)

La Marseillaise is heard again in Campiglio, after a lengthy absence. Winner of that edition is Patrice Bianchi, ahead of Alberto Tomba and young Austrian Thomas Sykora. For the first time, the organizers schedule two European Cup races, a slalom on the Miramonti and a giant slalom on the “Amazzonia” track in Pradalago, both events being dominated by the Swedish delegation.

 

Roll of honour:

World Cup slalom – 1. Patrice Bianchi (FRA); 2. Alberto Tomba (ITA); 3. Thomas Sykora (AUT)

EC slalom – 1. Thomas Fogdoe (SWE); 2. Patrick Staub (SUI); 3. Mats Ericson (SWE)

EC giant slalom – 1. Fredrik Nyberg (SWE); 2. Alberto Senigagliesi (ITA); 3. Sergio Bergamelli (ITA)

1993

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December 1993, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup) (European Cup)

One name comes to prominence in December 1993 at the 3Tre, that of the Slovenian Jure Kosir. Once again, Alberto Tomba finishes second, while Austrian Thomas Sykora rounds out the podium in the Miramonti slalom. The next day, in the European Cup, Italy’s Angelo Weiss lands the win.

 

Roll of honour:

World Cup slalom – 1. Jure Kosir (SLO); 2. Alberto Tomba (ITA); 3. Thomas Sykora (AUT)

EC slalom – 1. Angelo Weiss (ITA); 2. Thomas Fogdoe (SVE); 3. Patrick Staub (SUI)

1994

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December 1994, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup) (organized, but not held)

1995

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December 1995, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

In 1995, Albertone Tomba wins the Miramonti slalom for the third time in his career. The victory comes after a hard-fought challenge with Slovenian Jure Kosir, who reclaims his feeling with the Campiglio’s slope by holding up with the Italian until the second half of the second run, when a nasty crash ends his quest for glory. Yves Dimier, from France, is second, Italy’s Kurt Ladstaetter coming third. The two European Cup slalom races see Thomas Sykora (AUT) and Jesper Brugge (SWE) take the victory.

 

Roll of honour:

World Cup slalom – 1. Alberto Tomba (ITA); 2. Yves Dimier (FRA); 3. Kurt Ladstaetter (ITA)

EC slalom – 1. Thomas Sykora (AUT); 2. Thomas Stangassinger (AUT); 3. Fabio de Crignis (ITA)

EC slalom – 1. Jesper Brugge (SWE); 2. Didier Plaschy (SUI); 3. Fabrizio Tescari (ITA)

1996

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December 1996, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

An Austrian returns to the top of the podium in 3Tre, as Thomas Sykora wins the 1996 slalom, ahead of Tomba and Sebastien Amiez, from France. However, the edition is overshadowed by the rumours coming from abroad, concerning the future of this historic event. These rumours, which speak of an uncertain future, say that the International Federation plans to not include Campiglio in the calendar of next year’s World Cup.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Thomas Sykora (AUT); 2. Alberto Tomba (ITA); 3. Sebastien Amiez (FRA)

1997

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December 1997, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup) (organized, but not held)

 

Controversy, a cancelled race in front of thousands of spectators, and a hot press conference at Centro Rainalter: in short, this is the story of the 49th 3Tre, scheduled on Monday, December 22, 1997. The head of the International Ski Federation, Gunther Hujara, decided to cancel the slalom just minutes before the start, while the competitors were getting ready for the race. The official reason is that of technical deficiency in the snowpack preparation. For 3Tre, this is the most difficult moment in its history; excluded from the World Cup, the Trentino event has to start from scratch again.

1998

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December 1998, Madonna di Campiglio

The 50th edition takes place outside its natural environment, the Alpine Skiing World Cup. However, the people involved aren’t discouraged by this: after a change at the helm of the organizing committee, where Lorenzo Conci, the son of founder Fabio, takes the lead, things start over in Campiglio, with the perspective of a quick return onto the big stage. The slalom is organized in a partnership with Gazzetta dello Sport, and sees Jure Kosir win, after a hard fight, reminiscent of the ones in the World Cup. For the first time, on the podium there’s a young Italian, Giorgio Rocca – a preview of what was to come in the future – while Austria’s Mario Reiter is third. Also, for the first time in history, the race is scheduled in the evening, thanks to the nocturne installation of the Miramonti, which is inaugurated at this jubiliary edition.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Jure Kosir (SLO); 2. Giorgio Rocca (ITA); 3. Mario Reiter (AUT)

1999

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December 1999, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

After just one year of absence, the 3Tre is back in the World Cup calendar. December 1999 marks the return to the White Circus and the victory in this memorable comeback goes to an old acquaintance of the Miramonti: Norwegian Finn Christian Jagge. In the official meeting that takes place in the following Spring, at Portorose, the International Federation comes up with a new criterium: only one World Cup slalom will remain in Italy, and this is to take place, by alternance, in Campiglio and Sestriere.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Finn Christian Jagge (NOR); 2. Benjamin Raich (AUT); 3. Thomas Stangassinger (AUT)

2000

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December 2000, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

On paper, December 2000 should have seen a hiatus of Campiglio from staging this prestigious event, but it’s not the case, as FIS choose it to replace a cancelled race from Slovenia, and so, the 52nd edition of the 3Tre takes place (in combination with the giant slalom in Alta Badia). 2000 sees the total triumph of Austria, Mario Matt winning ahead of his countryman Heinz Schilchegger and Rainer Schoenfelder. For Matt, one of the greatest slalom specialists in modern skiing, that year is the starting point of a long and impressive career, in which he will achieve three world titles, one Olympic gold medal (Sochi 2014) and 15 World Cup victories. It’s not a great day for the Italian, best placed skier being Matteo Nana, in 20th position.

That winter, Campiglio also hosts the Snowboard World Championships on the 5 Laghi slopes, just weeks after the slalom on Miramonti.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Mario Matt (AUT); 2. Heinz Schilchegger (AUT); 3. Rainer Schoenfelder (AUT)

2001

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December 2001, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

The 53rd edition is dominated by the US, the Miramonti slalom being won by Bode Miller, who defeats Giorgio Rocca and Tom Stiansen. The happening was enriched by several side events: Campiglio hosts a FISI federal council meeting and an experimental elimination race, “superslalom KO”, created by FIS and won by the same Miller.

At the end of the edition, more novelties come for the organizing committee; after three years in charge, the committee is replaced by the accounts of the Snowboard World Championships held in 2001 January.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Bode Miller (USA); 2. Giorgio Rocca (ITA); 3. Tom Stiansen (NOR)

“KO” slalom – 1. Bode Miller (USA); 2. Markus Ganahl (LIE); 3. Ivica Kostelic (CRO)

2003

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December 2003, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

Ivica Kostelic: the first Croatian skier on the Miramonti bags the win. Kostelic (who will become world champion in 2011 and will go on to win 26 World Cup races) finishes first, followed by Giorgio Rocca – who misses yet again on the victory at the 3Tre – and Austrian Manfred Pranger.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Ivica Kostelic (CRO); 2. Giorgio Rocca (ITA); 3. Manfred Pranger (AUT)

2005

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December 2005, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

Under a heavy snowfall, Giorgio Rocca gets to finally celebrate a win, which comes at his competitive maturity. The Italian climbs on the top of the podium, at the expense of Austria’s Benjamin Raich. The snowfall that starts at the beginning of the second run comes with bad news for the organizing committee: the International Federation reveals its intention of moving the Italian World Cup slalom to Alta Badia. From that moment on, for the 3Tre begins its longest period of time outside of the international scene: four years, before a new change in the lead of the organizing committee.

2009

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December 2009, Madonna di Campiglio (European Cup)

In December 2009, the 3Tre returns as part of the European Cup. Canada’s Michael Janyk is first in the Miramonti slalom, after too many years of absence from the international calendar. Lorenzo Conci gets back in his position as chairman of the organizing committee.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Michael Janik (CAN); 2. Axel Baeck (SWE); 3. Cristian Deville (ITA)

2010

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December 2010, Madonna di Campiglio (European Cup)

While the organizers are working hard to bring the World Cup back to the Miramonti, Campiglio hosts the European Cup, and victory goes to Italy’s Patrick Thaler, ahead of two opponents from Sweden, Jens Byggmark and Mattias Hargin.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Patrick Thaler (ITA); 2. Jens Byggmark (SWE) 3. Mattias Hargin (SWE)

2011

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Madonna di Campiglio (European Cup)

After getting guarantees a couple of months earlier – at the FIS Congress, in Zurich – that the 3Tre would return to the World Cup in the following year, the venue hosts another slalom race in the European Cup. It’s the edition of the French, with the promising Victor Muffat-Jeandet and Thomas Mermillot-Blondin finishing on the top two positions.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Victor Muffat-Jeandet (FRA); 2. Thomas Mermillot-Blondin (FRA) 3. Krystof Kryzl (CZE)

2012

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December 2012, Madonna di Campiglio (World Cup)

As it comes back to the World Cup, the 3Tre has a sumptuous return for its 59th edition. Fans clearly had missed the World Cup event: twelve thousand spectators come to the Miramonti on the evening of Tuesday, December 18, 2012, a beautiful testimony of unconditioned love. The entire city works for the success of the event. The slope is in perfect condition; a very hard surface, proving very testing even for the greatest specialists in the World. It is not by chance that the Austrian Marcel Hirscher – World champion at that time – wins in front of his worthy opponent, Germany’s Felix Neureuther, the son of Christian, who was victorious here in 1979. The podium is rounded out by the Japanese Naoki Yuasa, after an amazing second run. The joy of the organizers is overshadowed by the sadness for the loss of ski teacher Bertocci, who passed away during the first run due to a heart stroke.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Marcel Hirscher (AUT); 2. Felix Neureuther (GER) 3. Naoki Yuasa (JPN)

2013

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December 2013, Madonna di Campiglio (European Cup)

 

A new event with a vintage touch: this is the distinctive feature of the 3Tre in December 2013. Thanks to the commitment of the Cableway company, the organizers can show the FIS a brand new slope, suited to fast races and built on the western side of the Pancugolo, above Canalone Miramonti. The 60th edition has the chance to test this track, as the downhill returns after being absent since 1975. The European Cup takes the opportunity to open the new track with two downhills; there would have been a third race (super G), if not for the bad weather and fog. Both downhills are dominated by young Swiss skiers, Marc Gisin and Nils Mani. Paolo Pangrazzi, Italian national champion in the downhill, also has a good run, finishing sixth and fourth, respectively.

 

Roll of honour:

dowhill – 1. Marc Gisin (SUI); 2. Christofer Hoerl (AUT); 3. Ralph Weber (AUT) downhill – 1. Nils Mani (SUI); 2.Nicolas Raffort (FRA); 3. Thomas Mayrpeter (AUT)

2014

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December 2014, Madonna di Campiglio (European Cup)

Felix Neureuther and Fritz Dopfer give Germany an unprecedented double in the 3Tre, which returns to the World Cup on Monday, December 22, 2014, two years after the triumph of Hirscher. The tight track of the first run enhances Felix’s skills, while unexpectedly putting Austrian World Champion Marcel Hirscher on the back foot on the soft snow after a mild December. In the stands there are thirteen thousand spectators, a huge number confirming the success and importance of the 3Tre. The satisfaction is double for the organizers, after the FIS confirms at its meeting in Bulgaria, in June 2015, that the 3Tre will return to the World Cup calendar on a permanent basis.

 

Roll of honour:

slalom – 1. Felix Neureuther (GER); 2. Fritz Dopfer (GER); 3. Jens Biggmark (SWE)